Grammar Girl

Grammar Girl is ready… ready to take on the dastardly foes of bad grammar, poor spelling and no punctuation. But has she learnt enough from her old tutor and superhero Captain Grammaticus to foil the plans of the most fiendish villain of them all…?

Find out in Grammar Girl, a new play on spelling, grammar and punctuation now available at three different levels:

Key Stage 1: we look at adding prefixes and suffixes, sequencing sentences, punctuating sentences, using conjunctions, expanding noun phrases, progressive verbs, using commas and apostrophes.

Lower Key Stage 2: we look at prefixes and suffixes, using conjunctions, the present perfect tense, expanding noun phrases, using fronted adverbials, punctuating direct speech, using nouns and pronouns and commas.

Upper Key Stage 2: we look at prefixes and suffixes, relative clauses, modal verbs, punctuation of parentheses, using colons and semi-colons, synonyms and antonyms, using the passive tense.

Feedback

“The children loved the pace and enthusiasm. They learnt a lot. Thank you.” Ashford Prep. School, Kent TN24

“Very informative and a fun way to learn SPaG.” West Minster Primary School, Sheerness, Kent ME12

“An absolutely brilliant performance which the children thoroughly enjoyed. Such an entertaining way of teaching punctuation and grammar.” Manorfield Primary School, Horley, Surrey RH6

“Absolutely fab..Would love to have you back…they learnt so much and it was also great revision.” Greenmeadow Primary School, Swindon SN25

“Fantastic morning!” Priestley Primary School, Calne, Wiltshire SN11

“Children loved the superhero theme, content on the screen was perfect and engaged children really well.” Twerton Infants School Bath BA2

OUR REQUIREMENTS: A space approximately 15ft x 15ft at one end of a school hall (raised or on the flat is fine) and access to a plug socket. Actors will introduce themselves to office staff on arrival and need their small van as close as possible to the performance area for loading and unloading.

SET-UP TIME: 45 minutes
DURATION: 60 – 65 minutes
PACK-UP TIME: 30 minutes
AUDIENCE LIMIT: 300

PRICES Please call or email us with your requirements as we often have special offers depending on where in the UK you’re based and when you want your show.

We invoice by post or email after the event and all our fees are fully inclusive apart from VAT.

Teachers' Notes

Download notes as a pdf.: grammar-girl-notes
The play follows the secret superhero Grammar Girl as she tries to find out what happened to Captain Grammaticus (who has disappeared from his nursing home for retired Superheroes) and along the way looks at various SPAG sections of the National Curriculum. There are three different versions of the play, for KS1, Lower KS2 or Upper KS2 and we look at the following topics:

KS1: we start by looking at the four different types of sentence; statement, command, question and exclamation and we punctuate each appropriately. We then learn that verbs are doing or being words and we identify them in various sentences (including the ‘ing’ form of a verb). Following on from this we learn that an adverb describes a verb and identify the adverb in a sentence. We look at contractions and contract various phrases eg, I will – I’ll etc. and we discuss adding an apostrophe in place of the missing letter. We then see how apostrophes are used to denote possession. Next, we look at what a noun is and identify nouns in various sentences, followed by adjectives and identify them too. We look at conjunctions (we call them joining words) and see that different conjunctions can be used to join two simple sentences and finish the play with a spoof ‘Mastermind’ where the question are a revision of what we’ve looked at throughout the play.

Lower KS2: we start with clauses and phrases and learn a clause is part of a sentence that has a subject and a verb whereas a phrase doesn’t have a verb or doesn’t have a subject and we ask the audience to identify whether various groups of words are clauses or phrases. We follow this by looking at main clauses and subordinate clauses in various sentences and learn that a compound sentence is made up of two main clauses joined by a conjunction. We then sum up that there are three types of sentence: a simple sentence with one clause, a complex sentence with a main clause and subordinate clause(s) and a compound sentence with two main clauses. We then move on to tenses and look at the ‘present’ tense and the ‘past’ tense of various verbs and change various verbs from one tense to the other, then look at the present perfect tense which describes something that has just happened. We move on to adverbs and identify them in a sentence (including non ‘ly’ adverbs such as ‘almost’). We again look at contractions and the use of apostrophes in place of missing letters and we look at the use of possessive apostrophes for singular and plural nouns, including plurals ending with or without an ‘s’ and the oddity that is ‘it’s’ or ‘its’. We move on to nouns and look at what makes them concrete or abstract and we look at the use of pronouns in place of a noun by replacing the noun in a sentence with the appropriate pronoun. We learn that adjectives describe nouns and identify adjectives in a paragraph of writing. Finally we look at use of commas and adverbials: with commas we learn they are used to separate items in a list, to join main clauses with a conjunction in a compound sentence and to separate the subordinate clause from the main clause in a complex sentence. We explain that ‘adverbials’ are words or phrases used like an adverb to add detail to a verb and look at how a fronted adverbial is followed by a comma. The final scene again is a ‘Mastermind’ spoof with the questions asked covering what we looked at in the play.

Upper KS2: again we look at clauses and phrases and learn a clause is part of a sentence that has a subject and a verb whereas a phrase doesn’t have a verb or doesn’t have a subject and we ask the audience to identify whether various groups of words are clauses or phrases. We follow this by looking at main clauses and subordinate clauses in various sentences and learn that a compound sentence is made up of two main clauses joined by a conjunction. We then sum up that there are three types of sentence: a simple sentence with one clause, a complex sentence with a main clause and subordinate clause(s) and a compound sentence with two main clauses. We then introduce the past progressive tense and have to put the right form of the verb into a sentence using the past progressive tense, and we move on to the past perfect tense which is used when talking about something that happened before something else. We then work through a paragraph of writing and convert the verbs into the past perfect tense and sum up the four tenses we have now encountered: the present progressive, the past progressive, the present perfect and the past perfect. We then again look at adverbs and identify them in a sentence (including non ‘ly’ adverbs such as ‘almost’) as above. We again look at contractions and the use of apostrophes in place of missing letters and we look at the use of possessive apostrophes for singular and plural nouns, including plurals ending with or without an ‘s’ and the oddity that is ‘it’s’ or ‘its’. We move on to nouns and again look at what makes them concrete or abstract. We introduce the concept of ‘proper nouns’ and we look at the use of pronouns in place of a noun by replacing the noun in a sentence with the appropriate pronoun. We learn that adjectives describe nouns and identify adjectives in a paragraph of writing. Finally we look at use of commas and adverbials: with commas we learn they are used to separate items in a list, to join main clauses with a conjunction in a compound sentence and to separate the subordinate clause from the main clause in a complex sentence. We revise the work on ‘adverbials’ – that they are words or phrases used like an adverb to add detail to a verb – and look at how a fronted adverbial is followed by a comma. The final scene again is a ‘Mastermind’ spoof with the questions asked covering what we looked at in the play.